Three major Korean colleages intertwine in this area, where there is a grid of restaurants, bars and restaurants.

When you’re thinking of nightlife entertainment options in Busan, areas like Haeundae and Seomyeon might come to mind. Haeundae has South Korea’s most famous beach and upscale venues, and Seomyeon has the perenially busy downtown vibe. 

Kyungsung university area in Nam-gu is south-west of Haeundae beach and busy with foreigners and locals

This hidden gem bar is right next to Peullanta cafe.

There were locals and expats in this Kyungsung area bar.

A third option for an area to spend your next Friday or Saturday night is located in the Nam-gu district, south-west of Haeundae. The neighbourhood is commonly referred to as Kyungsung, named after the university (and subway station) nearby.

A social meet-up was taking place with Busan Aussie Club

A casual style bar with delicious cocktails.

It’s a busy grid of restaurants, bars and shops catering to a younger demographic of students from three universities nearby: Kyungsung University, Pukyong National University and Tongmyong University. I felt curious to explore the many little streets glowing with neon lighting.

Basement-level bar.

A buzzing Kyungsung university area filled with a crowd of students, expats and younger residents.

Plenty of eating, drinking, shopping and karaoke opportunities close to Pukyong National University and Kyungsung University

A unique, hidden-gem bar with ample seating and a conversational, rustic space is Wayd Bar, or 웨이드 (Naver maps link). I joined in on a social meet-up hosted by Busan Aussie Club, where I met expats who were English teachers and local Korean people.

The General Yong Yong brand is present throughout South Korea, and is inspired by Hong Kong culture.

Late night drinks at General Yong Yong restaurant in the Kyungsung university area.

A small group of us decided to carry the night on and we visited a Hong Kong style restaurant with alluring decor called 용용선생 부경대점, or General Yong Yong (Naver maps link). The food was from Hong Kong cuisine, and it was great to chat at the comfortable booths. The service was prompt and the ambience was nice to hang-out and chat in. 

It’s pay per song. The sound and entertainment system was convenient to use. 

A snug Korean karaoke room (“noraebang”). 

If during your night out in Kyungsung university area you’ve had a few cocktails and you’re ready to belt out your favourite songs, it’s fun to visit a “noraebang” (노래방). These karaoke venues have cozy compartments outfitted with booming sound systems where you can sing from a wide selection of songs. You pay via cash and select the song.

A rainy night in the university area of Kyungsung.

A bar in Seomyeon that was still very much alive at 4am on a Saturday.

If your friends and you have decided that the night has not ended, you can catch a taxi to Seomyeon. It’s best to have your destination written or displayed on your phone in Korean, as many taxi drivers won’t speak English.

The downtown area of Seomyeon at around 4:30am.

I realised that ID (passport) is necessary at this club (and another venue), even though I had my Australian Driver’s Licence.

It was in the early hours of the morning during my night out that I realised how intense the nightlife in Busan can be. At 4am, the streets were still humming with people. We tried to enter a club but only passports were accepted. I am 28 and the legal maturity of my appearance rarely is questioned. I don’t mind, it speaks to the diligence of operations in Korea, the rules are to protect people.  

Electronic darts at a bar in Seomyeon. It was still open at 6am in the morning.